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5 Tips for Photographing a Real Estate Interior with Bright Windows

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Transcript

00:02
Hi, this is Stuart from the Photomatix team
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and here I’m going to share 5 tips
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for shooting a real estate interior with bright windows.
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So, let’s get started with our first tip by turning all the lights on in the room.
00:17
When taking a set of bracketed photos, lighting your interior is key,
00:22
as by making the room brighter,
00:23
will help reduce any differences in lighting in your scene.
00:30
In my next tip, we’ll set the ISO to 400.
00:34
And why are we doing this?
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Well, to keep this simple, the lower you set your ISO,
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the longer your exposures will need to be.
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… and then your results could very well end up being unusable,
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either overexposed
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or blurred.
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Or worse, both.
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So to avoid this, set your ISO to 400, but don’t go any higher,
00:56
because if you do, you’ll run the risk of your photos being noisy.
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Now let’s talk about the best way to set your shutter speed:
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point your camera at the interior and not at the window.
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Any bright light, and especially light coming in through a window,
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is going to dramatically affect your camera’s auto-exposure
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and you’ll just end up with a set of dark, underexposed photos.
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So, to overcome this, point your camera to somewhere inside the room
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that is far enough away from any source of direct light:
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and that includes the window or anything artificial. OK?
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Then, make a note of the shutter speed displayed by your camera
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and use it to set the ‘normal’ exposure for your bracketed photos.
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By ‘normal’, I am referring to the ‘0 EV’ photo of the bracketed sequence.
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Let me explain what I mean by ‘EV’.
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EV stands for ‘Exposure Value’ which is a value, or measurement,
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which is found on the photographic exposure scale.
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For example, if I asked you to take a set of 3 bracketed photos with a spacing of 2 EV,
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then each of your photos would have a separation of 2 units on the EV scale.
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You see?
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So, back to ‘0 EV’.
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Now this refers to the photo that appears in the very middle of your bracketed set.
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HDR relies on merging multiple photographs of the same scene
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and this means taking a series of long, bright, + exposures.
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together with short, darker, – exposures.
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Now let’s move onto a tip that is easily overlooked:
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switch your camera to ‘MANUAL MODE’.
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The reason you switch to ‘MANUAL MODE’ means that your
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aperture and your ISO remain the same
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once you’ve chosen your shutter speed.
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If you select any of your camera’s pre- programmed modes,
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then your bracketed photos will end up
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with different aperture and different ISO settings …
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and then if you merge photos with different apertures and different ISOs,
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then you’ll end up with an image which will has lost
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all its depth of field and simply won’t be sharp.
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And lastly, use a camera that can auto-bracket 5 photos at a spacing of 2EV.
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To get the best results, your bracketed photos will need to cover a wide range of exposures:
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from the darkest areas of the interior …
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all the way to the brightest window.
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So, to get everything you need, it could mean taking at least
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5 bracketed photos at 2EV …
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or 9 bracketed photos at 1EV.
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Let’s recap on our 5 tips:
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Turn all the lights on in the room.
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Set your ISO to 400.
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To set your shutter speed, point your camera
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at the interior, not at the window.
03:56
Switch your camera to ‘MANUAL MODE’.
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And finally, use a camera that can
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auto-bracket 5 photos at a spacing of 2EV.
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These tips should help you get started.
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Use them and you’ll soon see
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how much they improve your real estate interiors.

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Admin